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  • Manifold

    Well, sometime in the 14 years the Cordoba was on the road, someone threw a 2 barrel on to replace the Thermoquad. I have a Carter AFB on the shelf, and my buddy has graciously donated this intake. Now I see that the holes look like a spread bore pattern, but the flange itself looks like a square bore. Can I run the Carter without that bloody adapter to go to a spread bore?


  • #2
    Well, for what it's worth:

    That appears to be an Offenhauser aftermarket 4 bbl. manifold, without EGR, but having the later style electric-assisted choke. Not really familiar with aftermarket, and what has been used over the years!

    I THINK you will need an adapter to put a square-bore carb on the spread-bore manifold! But, you will probably need the correct adapter to separate runners, if it is a dual plane? Here again, I'm not sure....and,, if this has A/C or any other equipment, some of the mounting holes may not align with the existing brackets!

    BUT....my gut reaction is.....why do you think a 2 bbl. carb was swapped from 4 bbl.?? I assume that this was originally a 360, and it would be very rare for it to have a 4 bbl. from the factory, unless it was a California emissions car....as most were 2 bbl's. Canadian cars may be different, though.....don't know!

    What is the VIN of this car, specifically the 5th digit?, as this would indicate the original engine....and a "K" would indicate a 360 2 bbl., NOT a 4 bbl.


    Sorry I can't be of much more help.....but somebody here must know the answers.....lol!

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    • #3
      It's a big block car and according to the VIN left the factory with a 4 barrel, and the vacuum line diagram even shows a Thermoquad. I'm pretty sure it was changed over for mileage reasons as the sound those secondaries make when they open is pretty addicting lol.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by R-body_mopar View Post
        Well, for what it's worth:

        That appears to be an Offenhauser aftermarket 4 bbl. manifold, without EGR, but having the later style electric-assisted choke. Not really familiar with aftermarket, and what has been used over the years!

        I THINK you will need an adapter to put a square-bore carb on the spread-bore manifold! But, you will probably need the correct adapter to separate runners, if it is a dual plane? Here again, I'm not sure....and,, if this has A/C or any other equipment, some of the mounting holes may not align with the existing brackets!

        Sorry, I don't know much about the 400's, as most of my cars had E-58 360's, except for the two '72 Furies....and only one was a 440!


        Sorry I can't be of much more help.....but somebody here must know the answers.....lol!

        So.....somebody here must be able to suggest an adapter plate...as I think you will need one!

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        • #5
          I snagged a Mr. Gasket adapter last night, have used them in the past and never had a problem.

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          • #6
            Man, I really liked the TQ that was on my 71 340 Cuda. Yeah, they sound great with all 4 open but man, the in town mileage it gave when not 'abuse' was pretty impressive. Sorry, can't help ya on the AFB....never used one.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cranky View Post
              Man, I really liked the TQ that was on my 71 340 Cuda. Yeah, they sound great with all 4 open but man, the in town mileage it gave when not 'abuse' was pretty impressive. Sorry, can't help ya on the AFB....never used one.
              Oh no worries bud, I'm only running my Carter until I can find a Thermoquad to rebuild. With some of the upgrades I have in mind, the Carter will be too small.

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              • #8
                Alrighty, found a Thermoquad so no need to run an adapter!

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                • #9
                  Turns out the TQ I found is kind of desirable? It's a 9801S that I got from a buddy along with a 9022S and a few parts for the whopping sum of 40 bucks. Any opinions on the 9801?

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                  • #10
                    From "A Carter Thermo-Quad Guide by Vaanth"...

                    The Competition Series have raised pads on the upper bowl cover for a label. Also, the CS have minimal external attachments, such as the lack of a PCV port. The mixture screws are similar to the 71 OEM TQs.
                    The fuel inlet on the CS and the 78-84 OEM units was located in the rear center and the 71-77 OEM and 9000 series have the fuel inlet on the right rear side. The aftermarket 9000 series were available in 4 models: 9801, 9811, 9800, 9810. The 9801, 9811 have Chrysler linkage (9801/9811 is EGR capable). Note: later OEM TQs model number started with a 9 as well, but are not to be confused with the aftermarket 9000 series.


                    The Competition Series carbs should generally be avoided except for racing. The aftermarket 9000 series were available in 4 models: 9801, 9811, 9800, and 9810. The 9801, 9811 have Chrysler linkage (9811 is EGR capable). Note: later OEM TQs model number started with 9 as well, not to be confused with the 9000 series. The 9801/9811 is the prefered aftermarket TQ.




                    Last edited by DynoDave; 05-19-2016, 07:10 PM.
                    WPC# 12304 / 1970 Plymouth Duster / 1972 Dodge Charger Rallye / 1977 Chrysler Cordoba

                    www.cordobaclubusa.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doba77 View Post
                      Turns out the TQ I found is kind of desirable? It's a 9801S that I got from a buddy along with a 9022S and a few parts for the whopping sum of 40 bucks. Any opinions on the 9801?
                      Congrats on your find! The 9801S is probably a very rare item , that uses electric choke and NO EGR! Probably perfect for your use! I think it has the small primaries, but that should be a plus for a street driven car, helping with fuel mileage! The 9022S would probably work well, too, but it is listed for 1974 360 truck CA., with small primaries!

                      Thermoquads are probably the best carbs out there, but are generally misunderstood, and badly maligned for faults that are probably due to errors in setup! The most important thing is to follow ALL directions in adjusting the linkages IN ORDER, as each adjustment depends on the previous adjustment being CORRECT!

                      The full Vaanth guide can be found here (and it is probably the Bible of Thermoquads!):

                      http://ramchargercentral.com/engine/...ad-guide/?wap2

                      Another excellent reference guide is here (genuine factory Mopar training booklet!):

                      http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/L.../290/index.htm

                      Good luck with this project, and keep us posted on any results or problems!

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