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  • Rear end pictures

    I was checking my shocks yesterday, and I took these - does anyone know what these marks and stampings mean? Sorry if they weren't the rear end pictures you were hoping for -

    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]

  • #2
    I tried to blow up, but got an image not found. The rear end looks to contain date code and casting number.
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    • #3
      Sorry, it must be that chintzey image hosting site I am using - if you think you can make the identifications, I would be more than happy to email them to you -

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      • #4
        I will re-post the shots for ya...... I quit image shack cause they have gone changed their ways...


        Isn't the arrow for the time it was casted..like on a block?? so it was pulled from the mold @ 10... am 1st shift

        Yellow marker seems to be numbers from a junkyard. Replacement rearend??


        Any stampings on the axle tubes close to the center??

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        Last edited by ~~Mutt~~; 05-29-2015, 02:29 PM.
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        • #5
          Yup...you got it pretty good. The 9/93 looks to me to be a marking for Sept 93 that a wrecking yard may have sold it. The 204 may be a marking from assembly line worker. Never was much on factory paint marks and crayon codes since I'm not into numbers matching restorations etc.

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          • #6
            This has me curious now...about the top shot...the 7 the 8 ...circled A and the digits beside the A..

            Wonder if the 8 / 87 is the month and year casted..
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            • #7
              Originally posted by ~~Mutt~~ View Post
              This has me curious now...about the top shot...the 7 the 8 ...circled A and the digits beside the A..

              Wonder if the 8 / 87 is the month and year casted..
              I just know how to fix them lol

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              • #8
                Yeah..me too..Saw dust/oil mix and leather horse strap as a bearing... Worked in old farm trucks...LOL
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                • #9
                  Have never done saw dust or Crisco but right now my diesel has a rear end full of STP. It quieted the gear noise by at least 50%!!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cranky View Post
                    It quieted the gear noise by at least 50%!!

                    Thats why we used saw dust mixed with tha thick stuff.. Was good enough for the farm stuff...not really hitting over 10 mph...hardly any heat buildup
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                    • #11
                      Interesting - the Cordoba only has 49 thousand miles - makes me doubt the replacement rear end theory, but maybe the gal (just celebrated her 95th birthday) I bought the car from was a racer with her 360/4bbl hotrod and blew her pumpkin at some point! -or maybe she was hornswaggled by some huckster at a repair shop-

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                      • #12
                        In 69 my dad bought a new 440 powered New Yorker and by 4 months, the wheel bearings went out......and another set went out after another 4 months along with the trans. The trans may have been my fault but the car was just a all around lemon but the engine never missed a beat!! The dealer said that it's a possibility that the car was pulled down too tight during shipment to Texas. I'm building a rear end (still) for someone and one axle tube was over .090" off of center and that's actually pretty common! I have found them worse but how much is too much for the Timkens and the side gears inside? The other tube was only off about .030".

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cranky View Post
                          In 69 my dad bought a new 440 powered New Yorker and by 4 months, the wheel bearings went out......and another set went out after another 4 months along with the trans. The trans may have been my fault but the car was just a all around lemon but the engine never missed a beat!! The dealer said that it's a possibility that the car was pulled down too tight during shipment to Texas. I'm building a rear end (still) for someone and one axle tube was over .090" off of center and that's actually pretty common! I have found them worse but how much is too much for the Timkens and the side gears inside? The other tube was only off about .030".
                          Well, at least in '69 the NY'er had a 5yr/50,000mi. warranty; I was warranty administrator back then, and we did tons of rear ends and wheel bearings, although I was involved in few actual repairs myself, only an observer of how it was done.....lol! Most of the rear end work was 8.25" carrier bearings, and a quite a few 8.75" wheel bearings....and I don't think we ever measured axle tube centerlines........

                          I actually bought a very well used '69 NY'er for my girlfriend to daily drive to work....it was the best car she ever had; absolutely zero problems!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by R-body_mopar View Post
                            Well, at least in '69 the NY'er had a 5yr/50,000mi. warranty; I was warranty administrator back then, and we did tons of rear ends and wheel bearings, although I was involved in few actual repairs myself, only an observer of how it was done.....lol! Most of the rear end work was 8.25" carrier bearings, and a quite a few 8.75" wheel bearings....and I don't think we ever measured axle tube centerlines........

                            I actually bought a very well used '69 NY'er for my girlfriend to daily drive to work....it was the best car she ever had; absolutely zero problems!
                            In the 60's I used to go into the dealer's repair shops and look at how many present year cars were on the racks and seems like 69 wasn't that great of a year. There were very few 68 and later cars in for repairs. I did that quite often and didn't see the shops always full in 67 and 68. Not sure it that was a good way to judge that sort of thing or not tho. I 'trolled' the used car side and always checked out the back enough that most of the guys working there knew my name. Several years later (74?) I bought a 69 Fury II 4dr work car and I put that thing through pure hell and it never complained lol. It had about 80k miles on it...the ac didn't work and it had a bashed in front fender but I only gave 200 bucks for it You could get cars cheap back then. Anyways, the 69 my dad got was the only lemon from Chrysler since buying a 1950 Cranbrook and he never bought anything else until 65 when he went into business and started buying Chevy work trucks. I've never had a lemon and all I bought were used Mopars all the way up until 1990 when my wife and I bought a Dakota for our furniture store. I already had a 79 1 ton Dodge that was well worn when I bought it and drove it for another 10 years before giving it to the Salvation Army!

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                            • #15
                              So then...

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